The EU Says It’s A Take It Or Leave It Brexit Deal – OK, We’ll Leave It And Leave

That dog’s breakfast of a Brexit deal that Theresa May is trying to get through, the European Union has insisted that this is a take it or leave it deal. To which the correct response is sure, we’ll leave it and we’ll leave. What is actually being offered isn’t in fact leaving anyway, it’s an agreement to be tied to the Brussels apron strings without any voice at all in what they insist we do. That’s not the action of a sovereign nation, that’s to be reduced to a lickspittle colony. Better that we take the hit of crashing out into a WTO terms deal and then rebuild from there.

There is, of course, a glorious amount of missing the point going on:

A section on the “level playing field” requirements of the UK is also likely to be strengthened, with calls for “dynamic alignment” with a host of Brussels regulations, to reassure EU member states that Britain will not enjoy a competitive advantage from a future deal, in a move that could further poison the political atmosphere in London.

The point being that we’ve decided that the EU way of doing things is not for us. That might be a good idea, might be a bad one. But it’s still our decision. And yet the insistence now is that even though we have so decided we’ve still got to follow the EU way? Not just in what we’ve already agreed but in whatever foolishness they decide to tie themselves to in the future?

Yet the insistence is that it’s this way or the highway:

European leaders have launched a campaign to sell the Brexit deal struck with Theresa May on a “take it or leave it” basis as EU ambassadors in Brussels collectively agreed it would be impossible to make major changes.

Putting aside the anxieties of some about the 585-page withdrawal text, the 27 member states collectively ruled out a redrafting of the agreement by either side during a meeting with Michael Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator.

Barnier had told the EU ambassadors they should not engage in “bargaining”, despite the political situation in the UK. A number of British cabinet ministers are said to have chosen to stay in their posts purely to engineer a change in the agreement.

OK, the highway it is then. If the take it or leave it deal is that one on the table then we’ll leave it and leave. Might not be easy those first few weeks but give it a few years and we’ll benefit enormously. Precisely and exactly because we’ll not be tied to that EU method and thus will gain advantages. You know, trivial ones, freedom, liberty, sovereignty.

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Samarkand TonyHector Drummond, vile novelistRhoda Klapp Recent comment authors
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Rhoda Klapp
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Rhoda Klapp

It’s been educational to see how this option has become the Leave Which Must Not Be Named in news coverage. There is no discussion of it except to term it Crashing Out or Chaos. Do we not trade with all sorts of countries on WTO rules? Do not all sorts of other countries trade with the EU on WTO rules? Don’t WTO rules protect us from overt punitive action by the EU? It’s a real option. In terms of our immediate freedom it’s the best option. There is no logic in saying as so many tory bots have been on… Read more »

Hector Drummond, vile novelist
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If I’d known there we going to be an EU Army and conscription then of course I would have voted Remain.

Samarkand Tony
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Samarkand Tony

There does seem to be remarkably little discussion of this bit (95.1): “Decisions adopted by institutions, bodies, offices and agencies of the Union before the end of the transition period, […] shall be binding on and in the United Kingdom.” Given that it’s also the case that the UK cannot exit the transition period unilaterally, there is nothing to stop the EU enacting new, UK-only taxes and refusing to end the transition period. Signing up to the agreement as it stands would allow the EU, for example, to ‘tax’ 100% of every asset in the UK or held by a… Read more »