Farmers Can’t Shoot Pests – The Total Bureaucratisation Of Society

What we’ve got here is one of those conflicts between the prodnose and the free versions of society. The prodnose version is one in which it is only possible to do what is directly approved of. And backed up by the necessary form in triplicate. This is not a joke by the way, this is exactly what is being demanded. The free version of a society has a rather shorter list of things which may not be done. Most of those things being derived from general principles – killing people isn’t nice say – and encapsulated in general principles – don’t kill people. The exceptions and detailed permissions running the other way of course – don’t kill people unless you’re the executioner carrying out a valid judicial sentence.

This is prodnose:

Farmers have been banned from shooting ‘pest’ birds on their land as Natural England has bowed to a legal challenge from environmentalists including Chris Packham. Previously, the government issued a list of 16 birds it was permissable to kill under general license if they were causing damage to property or crops, or posing a health and safety issue. Under the old laws, they did not have to ask permission to kill the animals or record their deaths or the reason for shooting them. Now, Natural England has withdrawn all general licenses and if people want to shoot these ‘pest’ birds, including pigeons, Canada geese and crows, they must apply for an individual license.

An individual licence is not a licence to an individual to be able to cull pests. It is instead a licence to kill specific and individual examples of said pests:

The Countryside Alliance said the move is “completely impractical and irresponsible” and will result in “thousands of people unknowingly breaking the law.” Tim Bonner, chief executive of the group, said: “To withdraw the historic ability to manage these species without individual licences at 36 hours’ notice is a recipe for disaster. Many of those involved in pest control will be unaware of the changes, and this decision will only serve to bring the law into disrepute.”

A flock of pigeons descends upon your crops. You have to wait 36 hours for a form, in triplicate, before you can start preparing the birds for your pigeon pie. Total colei* of course. But that’s prodnoses for you. No understanding of reality their only care being that you don’t get to do anything without their signature.

The correct reaction being to declare open season on prodnoses of course. Without a shooting nor culling licence being necessary.

*Gibbon.

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David MooreQuentin VoleLeo SavanttsurreptitiousevilJonathan Harston Recent comment authors
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Jonathan Harston
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Jonathan Harston

Totally in conflict with Common Law. With the additional problem that once you legislate something out of Common Law and into Statute Law, it cannot go back again. Repealing the translation into Statute Law does not work, you now have to pass a new Statue Law. Sometimes that can work out quite nicely. The Fixed Term Parliament Act abolished the Common Law power of the Prime Minister to call an election. Abolishing the FTPA won’t give that power back to the PM, satute cannot revert to common. You would have to abolish the FTPA and replace it with something else… Read more »

surreptitiousevil
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surreptitiousevil

And you’ve seen the Packham Twatter?

Quentin Vole
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Quentin Vole

Ground-nesting birds and their eggs are vulnerable to foxes and crows. Without gamekeepers shooting these predators, there’ll be a lot fewer curlew, lapwing, harriers etc. The RSPB shoot crows on some of their reserves for precisely this reason.

Quentin Vole
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Quentin Vole

When we told them we had rats, the council sent a nice man round to put out bait boxes. Whom should I dob him in to?

Leo Savantt
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Leo Savantt

Local authorities have been gassing foxes in their holes, we will no doubt see some municipal contrivance to control pigeons in future, probably using mass methods of extermination. The people must be prevented, the bureaucrat enabled. The UK is really becoming more and more a rather horrible country. Sad.

Quentin Vole
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Quentin Vole

We’re turning into Germany.

David Moore
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David Moore

Do you need the specific names for each of the offenders on the said paperwork before you can execute them?