Ultra-Processed Food Is Good For You – Unprocessed Food Kills You

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Contrary to what we’re repeatedly told by the health fanatics ultra-processed food is in fact good for us. Because unprocessed food kills, as a couple of people and 50 unlucky cats have just found out.

You see, to play off fashionable nostrums a company decided to make “natural”, “unprocessed” food for moggies. At £4.50 a day’s supply this was a wondrous method of fleecing the gullible. Why not give cats a chunk of raw venison?

Well, bovine TB is why not:

Posh ‘natural’ pet food recalled as cats and their owners develop bovine tuberculosis
Fifty pedigree animals on a pricy gourmet diet have been taken ill and at least one has died, with two people also infected

Those freezers at Iceland are looking a bit more appealing now, aren’t they?

A luxury cat food designed for pedigree pets has triggered an outbreak of a deadly strain of tuberculosis that has infected 50 cats and at least two of their owners. The “natural cat” wild venison cat food has been subjected to a nationwide recall by Natural Instinct, the company which sold it to thousands of cat owners as a healthier alternative to mass-produced pet food.

Actually, boiling up scrag end for a few hours is very healthy indeed.

The one thing all the cats had in common was that they were fed Natural Instinct’s raw wild venison cat food which costs about £4.50 for two daily portions, compared with under 20p for a typical dried cat food.

Fleece The Idiots!

Danielle Gunn-Moore, professor of feline medicine at Edinburgh University, who co-authored the research, said: “Raw meat diets could be good for cats, in theory, but there is a clear risk of infection so checks are vital. It’s not just bTB — there’s also a risk of toxoplasmosis, salmonella and other pathogens.”

Humans who eat an unprocessed diet are prone to all sorts of horribles that disease, maim and even kill them. That is, there’s a significant benefit to processed, even ultra-processed foodstuffs. Entirely contrary to near everything the public health authorities try to tell us currently. Which is a wondrous use of our tax money, isn’t it?

You see, it’s not so much that Mother Nature wants to kill us it’s that significant other components of Gaia really, really, want to come eat us. Processing food kills them before they get a chance to do so.

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Tristram FullerMatt RyanJonathan HarstonLeo SavanttQuentin Vole Recent comment authors
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Quentin Vole
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Quentin Vole

Back in the 60s, our dog was fed from big lumps of horse meat, boiled in the kitchen for hours and then kept in the pantry for a week. She suffered little harm from this diet.

Leo Savantt
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Leo Savantt

No doubt it was the boiling that saved your pup.

Jonathan Harston
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Jonathan Harston

Processing food – ie, cooking, followed by preserving – was the biggest leap forward in human health, *ever*, and the idiots want to reverse it.

Well, let the idiots eat their raw unprocessed ground scrapings.

Matt Ryan
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Matt Ryan

As a kid in Ireland we used to drink raw milk. Plenty of cow shit in it (albeit pretty dilute). Good stuff – bugger this pasteurisation – kids would not be so prone to things like asthma if they had more germs in them.

Leo Savantt
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Leo Savantt

Butter and cheese are both highly processed, apart from being to many (but not TFL) delicious, the reason that they are processed is to prevent the raw ingredient from spoiling. Salting meat, fish, and if you are German, cucumbers and cabbage, are all processed. Wine is processed grape juice, cider apples etc. The perversely named Angel Delight, Chicken Nuggets and KFC are also processed, so it seems that some processes are better than others. Or are they? In an age of relativism where equality is valued more than quality, all processing should either be banned or everything should be processed.… Read more »

Tristram Fuller
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Tristram Fuller

This is rather an ‘apples and oranges’ comparison and leads to a rather simplistic conclusion though the article is interesting. I feed my dogs organic raw food which is technically food grade (though I never have been tempted to eat it – there are other things in it that make it more suitable for dogs anyway) and I (and others) notice they are better for it (versus kibble). Firstly I realise that the raw food vs kibble one is rather a ‘religious’ one, so each to their own. It costs me about £2.80 a day per dog (so obviously these… Read more »