Well, Carlos Ghosn Is Actually Correct Here

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We can’t quite say that Carlos Ghosn is right here, for that implies a measure of his being righteous in his fleeing Japan. But he is correct on that Japanese justice system. It just ain’t like the one we’ve got at home.

Carlos Ghosn, the former Nissan chairman who is on bail and awaiting trial in Japan on charges of financial misconduct, has confirmed he has fled to Lebanon and said he refuses to be “held hostage” by a “rigged” Japanese justice system.

….
“I am now in Lebanon and will no longer be held hostage by a rigged Japanese justice system where guilt is presumed, discrimination is rampant, and basic human rights are denied,” Mr Ghosn, 65, said in a statement after he arrived in Beirut on Tuesday.

Of course, many convicted in Japan’s system are indeed bang to rights but it’s doubtful whether any conviction at all in that system would stand up to an appeal in any EU or US jurisdiction. As we’ve noted before they simply do things differently there:

That’s one way that system is indeed different. Sure, they have courts, lawyers, know what the word evidence means and all that. They’re just not very important in the system. Instead, the accused confesses and by doing so manages to extirpate some of the shame of having committed the crime. And that holding regime leading up to the court appearance – trial would be too glorified a word – is designed to aid in reaching the stage of wishing to make such a confession.

There’s nothing very surprising or odd about the way that Carlos Ghosn is being treated in that Japanese jail. That’s just what their system is. Decry it all we wish, just don’t be surprised.

I wouldn’t go so far as to insist that I approve of the fleeing of the jurisdiction. But given the manner of trial in it I’m not in the least surprised.

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John B
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John B

‘ … Japanese justice system. It just ain’t like the one we’ve got at home.‘

Yes it is: but not like the one the UK used to have and should still have.

DPW
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DPW

As often, Tim, your posts have encouraged creative thinking in me. Linking this post with the Ayia Napa one yesterday, perhaps what Zelia G and other feminists want is the Japanese justice system transposed to Cyprus (or the EU in general). After all, what could be better for a feminist trial of a man than a presumption of guilt (because she must be believed), rampant discrimination (dangly bits = disgusting animal) and denial of basic rights (to the accused only, of course). I’m sure the UK Supreme Court could find some pretext from medieval times to support such an approach… Read more »

Gavin Longmuir
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Gavin Longmuir

Let’s be realistic — we don’t have “Justice” systems anymore, we have “Legal” systems put in place by lawyers acting as legislators. “Justice” systems try to achieve, well, justice — in as far as that can be done in an imperfect world. “Legal” systems keep lots of non-productive overhead people off the streets and out of the rain while enriching themselves. If a “Legal” system ever delivers actual justice, it is entirely accidental. As the great man said — First, let’s hang all the lawyers.

Pcar
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Pcar

I see Furrin Sec. Dominic Raab has stuck his oar in on the Cyprus case; he’s sided with the woman convicted of perjury

More fool him