What’s So Bad About Lower Costs, Cheaper Goods And Greater Choice?

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Mr. Lowe:

Well, quite. Which leads us to this in The Guardian. The piece comes from:

Sue Pritchard is chief executive of the Food, Farming and Countryside Commission

And the line to worry about is this:

But it also has downsides. The kind of buccaneering free trade anticipated by the likes of Liz Truss is about handing over more power to the markets to drive down costs, producing cheaper goods and a greater range of options.

Yes, OK, it is possible that there would be, will be, downsides to an entirely free trade position. I don’t think there will be and I want, if you believe there will be, you to present some serious evidence. No, driving British farmers bust is not evidence of a problem that’s part of the point.

But note what is being said there. Having lower costs in food production, cheaper prices and greater choice is a series that we should not be striving for. These are bad things we are being told.

Oh.

Now think of how terrible our world is going to be if we run it along the lines suggested by these idiots. All of these idiots that is, the entire Woken Intelligentsia. Higher costs, higher prices and less choice. Except, presumably, for the Woken Nomenklatura.

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Boganboy
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Boganboy

‘Higher costs, higher prices and less choice. Except, presumably, for the Woken Nomenklatura.’

Since for me, it’s all about me, I don’t find this enchanting. After all, I’m not part of the Woken Nomenklatura.

Michael van der Riet
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Michael van der Riet

This is no laughing matter. Before Brexit there was a farrier, a fletcher, a groom, a rat catcher, an iceman, a milkman and a postillion in every street. It’s sad to see all these honorable trades disappear.