Ole Gunnar Solskjaer And The Rape Case

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An entirely extraordinary demand being made in this case concerning Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and the alleged rapes in Norway.

Innocent people should be fired, refused the ability to work and feed their family. Sounds a bit absurd, evil in fact, but that is the demand being made:

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer should not have picked a player charged with rape while he was awaiting trial, the lawyer who fought the decision to release black cab rapist John Worboys has insisted.

After an alleged rape victim condemned Solsjkaer’s decision to continue fielding Babacar Sarr, the man accused by her and two other women while the Manchester United manager was at Molde, Harriet Wistrich agreed players who have been charged with such crimes should be suspended by their clubs.

The woman criticising Solsjkaer told The Daily Telegraph there was no way a taxi driver would be allowed to continue working if charged with rape and Wistrich, one of the country’s leading lawyers in the field of violence against women and the director of the Centre for Women’s Justice, said the same should have applied in her own case.

“There is an issue about innocent-until-proven-otherwise,” Wistrich said. “But once the issues are out there and it’s clear – as the woman says – that it’s not simply an allegation but he’s been charged, he should certainly have been suspended then, at the very least.

The innocent until proven otherwise isn’t an issue, it’s the issue. We’re all of us free to go about our legal business as we wish, unless and until there is a proven case against us for whatever it is. At which point sure, throw the book, lock that prison cell and dispose of the key. But the punishment comes after the conviction, not before.

And yes, being thrown out of work is punishment. Being deprived of your income is punishment.

All of this, of course, before we consider the basic issue here. An employer may employ who he wishes, when and how. If that includes convicted criminals, let alone those with an allegation against them, then so be it, their business, their reputation.

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Spike
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Spike

“Never mind the absence (so far) of proof; it’s about the seriousness of the charges!” Washington DC goes there from time to time, generally if there is no better case.

john77
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john77

Ched Evans, eventually acquitted of raping a girl who did not claimed that he had raped her, spent two years in prison and had his career destroyed. Even after his acquittal he never returned to the Welsh team. Went from being worth £3m+ to zilch on the basis of a trumped-up charge by a publicity-seeker and/or feminist-zealot.
Wistrich wants to make this standard practice.

Addolff
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Addolff

John, I believe the police / CPS pushed the prosecution of Evans as appears to be the case with Caroline Flack.
Am still waiting for the apology to Evans from Jessica Ennis

Pcar
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Pcar

An employer may employ who he wishes, when and how. If that includes convicted criminals, let alone those with an allegation against them, then so be it, their business, their reputation

My bold: Timpsons being one

Problem in UK is Gov’t police & CPS presume Guilty until proven innocent, with process being part of the punishment.

Thus, if found innocent, still been punished (for wasting police time?)

jgh
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jgh

When I was on Taxi Licensing we found that for people with youthful legal indiscretions, taxi driving was a good career, as it forced them onto the strait and narrow. The rules did mean that each yearly renewal required it to go to the board, which typically went:
Come in Mr Smith. Kept your nose clean? Ok, wait outside. Ok? Ok. Ok. Bring Mr Smith back in. Ok, Mr Smith, your license has been renewed.

Chester Draws
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Chester Draws

Given how hard it is for convicted felons to get jobs, many people regard hiring them as praiseworthy.

Slightly different if he were coaching a female team, but what danger is he posing by playing football, even if guilty?

Boganboy
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Boganboy

I do agree with you. But of course you can quite justly accuse me of hypocrisy or at least inconsistency as I certainly do not want Shamima to come to my country.

As always it comes down to my personal self-interest. Shamima might well feel I’m better off murdered, but no one could be so desperate as to want to rape me.